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World wide in Site LEMON TREE
Lemongrass

is native to the Philippines. It is widely used as a herb in Asian cuisine. It has a citrus flavor and can be dried and powdered, or used fresh. Lemongrass is commonly used in teas, soups, and curries. It is also suitable for poultry, fish, beef, and seafood. It is often used as a tea in African countries such as Togo and the Democratic Republic of the Congo and Latin American countries such as Mexico.

Lemongrass oil is used as a pesticide and a preservative. Research shows that lemongrass oil has anti-fungal properties.

Fresh lemongrass

Basil

is a popular herb, and the species is most commonly the sweet basil Ocimum basilicum, of the family Lamiaceae (mints). Basil, originally from India, is best known as a culinary herb prominently featured in Italian cuisine, and also plays a major role in the Northeast Asian cuisine of Taiwan and the Southeast Asian cuisines of Thailand, Vietnam, Cambodia, and Laos. Depending on the species and cultivar, the leaves may taste somewhat like anise, with a strong, pungent, often sweet smell. There are many varieties of Ocimum basilicum, as well as several related species or species hybrids also called basil.

Thai basil, lemon basil and holy basil, which are used in Asia. While most common varieties of basil are treated as annuals, some are perennial in warm, tropical climates, including holy basil and a cultivar known as 'African Blue'.

Basil is originally native to India and other tropical regions of Asia, having been cultivated there for more than 5,000 years.

Thai basil

Sambal

is a chili based sauce which is normally used as a condiment. Sambals are popular in Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, the southern Philippines and Sri Lanka, as well as in the Netherlands and in Suriname through Javanese influence. It is typically made from a variety of peppers, although chili peppers are the most common. It is sometimes a substitute for fresh chilis. It can be extremely spicy for the uninitiated. Some ready-made sambals are available at exotic food markets or gourmet departments in supermarkets in many countries.

Sambal

Green curry

is a variety of curry in Thai cuisine. The name "green" curry derives from the color of the dish. Other Thai curry dishes are identified solely by their colors, such as yellow and red curry. Green curries tend to be as hot as red curries. However, green curries, regardless of heat, have a definite and desired sweetness that is not usually associated with red curries.

The main ingredients for the sauce consist of coconut milk, green curry paste, aubergine, pea aubergine, sugar, fish sauce, kaffir lime leaves, and Thai basil leaves. The consistency of its sauce varies with the amount of coconut milk used. Green curry paste is made by pounding in a mortar green chillies, shallots, garlic, galangal, kaffir lime peel, roasted coriander and cumin seeds, white peppercorns, shrimp paste and salt. The paste is briefly fried in split coconut cream, then coconut milk, meat or fish, and vegetables added along with a pinch of palm sugar. Finally, kaffir lime leaves, phrik chi fa ("sky-pointing chilies", large mild chilies) and Thai basil are added just at the end of cooking for fragrance. When the curry is made with fish or seafood, krachai (wild ginger, Chinese keys) is added.

Thai green curry can be made with all kinds of meat. However, the more popular ones are made with beef, pork, chicken, and fish ball. The green curry is usually eaten with rice or with round rice noodles known as khanom chin.

Green curry paste
Red curry

Miso

is a traditional Japanese seasoning produced by fermenting rice, barley and/or soybeans, with salt, the most typical miso being made with soy. The result is a thick paste used for sauces and spreads, pickling vegetables or meats, and mixing with dashi soup stock to serve as miso soup, a Japanese culinary staple. High in protein and rich in vitamins and minerals, miso played an important nutritional role in feudal Japan. Miso is still very widely used in Japan, both in traditional and modern cooking, and has been gaining world-wide interest. Miso is typically salty, but its flavor and aroma depend on various factors in the ingredients and fermentation process. Different varieties of miso have been described as salty, sweet, earthy, fruity, and savory, and there is a very wide variety of miso available.

Miso
Wasabi

originally Wasabia japonica, Cochlearia wasabi, or Eutrema japonica, also known as Japanese horseradish is a member of the Brassicaceae family, which includes cabbages, horseradish, and mustard. Its root is used as a condiment and has an extremely strong flavor. Its hotness is more akin to that of a hot mustard rather than the capsaicin in a chili pepper, producing vapors that stimulate the nasal passages more than the tongue. The plant grows naturally along stream beds in mountain river valleys in Japan. There are also other species used, such as W. koreana, and W. tetsuigi. The two main cultivars in the marketplace are W. japonica cv. 'Daruma' and cv. 'Mazuma', but there are many others.

Wasabi is generally sold either as a root which is very finely grated before use, or as a ready-to-use paste in tubes similar to travel toothpaste tubes. In restaurants the paste is prepared as needed by the customer using the root and a grater directly; once the paste is prepared, it loses flavor in 15 minutes. In sushi preparation, because covering wasabi until served preserves flavor, sushi chefs usually put the wasabi between the fish and the rice.

Fresh wasabi leaves can be eaten, having the hot flavor of wasabi roots. Because the burning sensations of wasabi are not oil-based, they are short-lived compared to the effects of chili peppers, and are washed away with more food or liquid. The sensation is felt primarily in the nasal passage and can be quite painful depending on amount taken.

Wasabi is served with sushi or sashimi accompanied with soy sauce. The one is sometimes mixed to form a single dipping sauce known as wasabi-joyu.

Wasabi
Wasabi